Screen Print File Prep for ThinkJoule

February 24, 2016 2 min read

Screen print file prep is an important part of making a great custom notebook, because there are so many variables in play when it comes to putting ink on paper.

From stretching of paper in the printing process, to the naturally porous nature of chipboard, you want to ensure an optimal overlap of colors to prevent unprinted paper from showing in the final printed product.

The talented branding team at ThinkJoule came to us with this intriguing and thoughtful design, which embodies their attention to detail and communication by illustrating the structural elements of a typeface. 

While the white callouts perfectly identify the element being described, they were masking the grey primary font structure. If the white was printed directly on top of the grey, we would expect thin lines of grey to appear at the edges of the white, or occasionally we'd see 'flashing' where brown kraft would appear unintentionally between the printed elements.

screen print registration

By letting the grey run ever so slightly under the white (and removing the rest) we ensured that only the bare minimum of registration errors were apparent in the final print.

There's a great creative spark in this typeface-oriented design, and we love that the ThinkJoule team creates brand experiences that endure in the hearts and minds of their audiences. Check them out!

 

If you'd like us to take a look at your design please send it to art@guidedproducts.com. We'd love to provide feedback early in the process so you know you're on the right track.

 


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